Data from the Gaia Space Telescope reveals the original galaxy’s core

K . The y-axis shows the difference between [M/H] Estimates based on XP and APOGEE spectra as a function of APOGEE’s A K . There is no evidence for any systematic tendency of ∆[M/H] with A K to the extinction level that corresponds to A V ≈ 3. Credit: Hans-Walter Rix et al, The Poor Old Heart of the Milky Way, arXiv: 2209.02722 [astro-ph.GA] ” width=”422″ height=”530″/>

Top of page: Validate files [M/H] Estimates from Gaia XP data as an actual function [M/H] From APOGEE. Bottom: sensitivity (In-) for [M/H] Extinction estimates, aK. The y-axis shows the difference between [M/H] Estimates based on XP Spectra and APOGEE as a function of APOGEE’s AK. There is no evidence for any systematic tendency of ∆[M/H] withK to the extinction level that corresponds to AFifth ≈ 3. Credit: Hans-Walter Rix et al, The Poor Old Heart of the Milky Way, arXiv: 2209.02722 [astro-ph.GA]

An international team of researchers has discovered the original core of the Milky Way. They wrote a paper describing their findings and posted it to the arXiv preprint server.

Astronomers have long assumed that the cores of stars are almost certainly found in the center of the Milky Way, but so far, they haven’t been able to find evidence. In this new effort, the researchers took on the challenge by sifting through data from the Gaia space telescope. The theory also suggested that if there was a core of stars in the center of the galaxy, it was very likely that they contained much less minerals than other stars because they had formed before these minerals were scattered throughout the region where the Milky Way formed (roughly) before 12.5 billion years old).

Thus, it is likely to consist mostly of helium and hydrogen. The search for stars that fit into this category has narrowed things down somewhat—and so have long-held theories that have long suggested that if there were a nucleus of stars at the center of the galaxy, they were more likely to be in the constellation Sagittarius, as it is located in What appears to be the center of the galaxy’s disk. That still leaves the team sifting through nearly two million stars, which is certainly a daunting task. But through the help of a computer and perseverance, they found what they were looking for – a group of about 18,000 stars in the center of the Milky Way. The researchers note that stars in the mass have less than 3% of the metal concentration of distant stars.

For more testing star clusterThe researchers observed its movement compared to other stars around it, and also determined the location of what should be the center of the galactic disk. They also represent stars that are obscured by dust or other objects. Convinced that they had found the heart of the Milky Way, they took measurements and found that the mass makes up only 0.2% of the galaxy’s mass.


Image: Hubble rests on globular cluster Terzan 9


more information:
Hans-Walter Rix et al, The Poor Old Heart of the Milky Way, arXiv: 2209.02722 [astro-ph.GA] arxiv.org/abs/2209.02722

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